Notes:

Preserved at Italian Air Force museum of Vigna di Valle. The history of this exceptional transport aircraft begins in 1932, when the American Airline TWA turned to Donald Wills Douglas to supply its fleet with a modern twin-engine transport aircraft. Thus was born in 1933 the DC.1, a 12-seater aircraft, which however will remain a unique piece. With greater success in 1934 the DC2 was produced, with a capacity of 14 seats, produced more than 150 copies. From the DC2 with an enlarged fuselage, larger wing, more powerful engines and other substantial modifications, in 1935 what will become the largest number of transport aircraft in the world comes to life: the DC3. The DC3 had superior performance compared to all competing aircraft (28 seats, more than 2,400 km of autonomy) and produced a real revolution in air transport. In the early 1940s the total production of these aircraft amounted to 1,123 units built in the American factories, 2,000 produced in the Soviet Union under license, not counting the 487 “Showa” produced by Japan. Many of these aircraft at the outbreak of the war were transformed into a military version and took the abbreviations of C.48, C.49, C.50, C.51, C.52, C.68, C.84, but it is with the models specifically built on military specifications, the C.47 “Skytrain” for mixed transport and the C.53 “Skytrooper” for troop transport, that this aircraft enters into the legend of air transport. A name, “DAKOTA”, given by the RAF to its C.47 aircraft in use since 1942, will distinguish it all over the world up to the present day. Even today, demonstrating its exceptional longevity, it is not unusual to see a DC3 fly across the skies of every continent. The model on display (c / n 19194, belonging to the 14th "Stormo radiomisure") is one of the 40 aircraft of this type used by the Italian Air Force since 1950 in various tasks (Multimotor School, Radiomisure Department, VIP Transport, Flight Department of the General Staff).

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MM61776

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Aug 26, 2021

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Nov 30, 2021

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Notes

Preserved at Italian Air Force museum of Vigna di Valle. The history of this exceptional transport aircraft begins in 1932, when the American Airline TWA turned to Donald Wills Douglas to supply its fleet with a modern twin-engine transport aircraft. Thus was born in 1933 the DC.1, a 12-seater aircraft, which however will remain a unique piece. With greater success in 1934 the DC2 was produced, with a capacity of 14 seats, produced more than 150 copies. From the DC2 with an enlarged fuselage, larger wing, more powerful engines and other substantial modifications, in 1935 what will become the largest number of transport aircraft in the world comes to life: the DC3. The DC3 had superior performance compared to all competing aircraft (28 seats, more than 2,400 km of autonomy) and produced a real revolution in air transport. In the early 1940s the total production of these aircraft amounted to 1,123 units built in the American factories, 2,000 produced in the Soviet Union under license, not counting the 487 “Showa” produced by Japan. Many of these aircraft at the outbreak of the war were transformed into a military version and took the abbreviations of C.48, C.49, C.50, C.51, C.52, C.68, C.84, but it is with the models specifically built on military specifications, the C.47 “Skytrain” for mixed transport and the C.53 “Skytrooper” for troop transport, that this aircraft enters into the legend of air transport. A name, “DAKOTA”, given by the RAF to its C.47 aircraft in use since 1942, will distinguish it all over the world up to the present day. Even today, demonstrating its exceptional longevity, it is not unusual to see a DC3 fly across the skies of every continent. The model on display (c / n 19194, belonging to the 14th "Stormo radiomisure") is one of the 40 aircraft of this type used by the Italian Air Force since 1950 in various tasks (Multimotor School, Radiomisure Department, VIP Transport, Flight Department of the General Staff).

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Nikon D500 | Nikon AF-S DX 18-105 mm f/3.5-5.6 ED VR Show Exif data
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