Notes:

Registred as N90760 to American Airlines, and delivered on 1 July 1951.[2] Named "Flagship Michigan" (#760), the aircraft was renamed "Flagship Detroit" in December 1953. Initially leased from American by Lloyd Aereo Boliviano on 5 January 1964, it was purchased outright by the latter company on 2 March 1965, becoming CP-740. Withdrawn from use and stored at La Paz in 1974, it was transferred to Fuerzas Aereas Bolivianas, and used for spare parts. In October 1994, the aircraft was purchased by Capt. Dicky Chavez, for a restoration that never happened, before joining Air Beni in September 1997 as CP-2291 for conversion to freighter configuration. On 12 October 1999, after the aircraft had undergone repairs at La Paz-El Alto Airport in Bolivia, a mechanic and a flight engineer tried to start the engines when a fire erupted in the no. 2 engine, prompting both crew members to flee from the aircraft without following the correct emergency procedures. The fire spread, destroying part of the fuselage, as the airport fire fighting services were practicing elsewhere on the airport and failed to reach the scene in time. After the fire the damaged forward part of the aircraft was removed and the aft part was left to rust away.

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Registration

CP-740

Photo Date

Sep 23, 1994

Uploaded

Feb 22, 2021

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Notes

Registred as N90760 to American Airlines, and delivered on 1 July 1951.[2] Named "Flagship Michigan" (#760), the aircraft was renamed "Flagship Detroit" in December 1953. Initially leased from American by Lloyd Aereo Boliviano on 5 January 1964, it was purchased outright by the latter company on 2 March 1965, becoming CP-740. Withdrawn from use and stored at La Paz in 1974, it was transferred to Fuerzas Aereas Bolivianas, and used for spare parts. In October 1994, the aircraft was purchased by Capt. Dicky Chavez, for a restoration that never happened, before joining Air Beni in September 1997 as CP-2291 for conversion to freighter configuration. On 12 October 1999, after the aircraft had undergone repairs at La Paz-El Alto Airport in Bolivia, a mechanic and a flight engineer tried to start the engines when a fire erupted in the no. 2 engine, prompting both crew members to flee from the aircraft without following the correct emergency procedures. The fire spread, destroying part of the fuselage, as the airport fire fighting services were practicing elsewhere on the airport and failed to reach the scene in time. After the fire the damaged forward part of the aircraft was removed and the aft part was left to rust away.

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